The USDA says healthy adults who eat a diverse diet with at least 8-10 grams of soluble fiber a day have fewer antibiotic-resistant microbes in their guts. A new study from ARS scientists shows microbes that have resistance to various commonly used antibiotics are a significant source of risk for people worldwide, with the widely held expectation that the problem of antimicrobial resistance is likely to worsen throughout the coming decades. The researchers found that regularly eating a diet with higher levels of fiber and lower protein levels, especially from beef and pork, was significantly correlated with lower levels of antimicrobial resistance genes among their gut microbes.

Healthy adults eating a diverse diet with at least 8-10 grams of soluble fiber a day have fewer antibiotic-resistant microbes in their guts. Soluble fiber is found in foods such as grains, beans, lentils, nuts, and some fruits and vegetables.

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